Regulations

 

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State/ProvinceMissouri
Agency & Contacts
Dept. of Agriculture regulates elk meeting the "livestock" definition (Contact Person for Dept. of Agriculture is Dr. Taylor Woods, DVM - Missouri State Veterinarian (573) 751-3377). Department of Conservation regulates free-ranging elk, mule deer, and white-tailed and captive cervids in hunting preserves and breeding facilities. Contact Dean Harre, (573) 751-4115 ext. 3258. Missouri has a State CWD Task Force co-chaired by the Departments of Agriculture and Conservation. Participants include a broad array of stakeholders including the captive cervid industry, meat processors and conservation organizations. Change to occur - March 1, 2010 the Missouri Department of Agriculture will assume the role of regulating all herds (elk, mule deer, and white-tailed deer) that are enrolled in the State's CWD monitoring program.
Standard Regulations
See CWD Regulations for Captive Cervids and Wildlife.
CWD Regulations for Captive Cervids and Wildlife
1.) Captive cervids will not be allowed to enter the state if within the last five years the animal: (A) is from an area that has been reported as a CWD endemic area; (B) has been in a CWD endemic area; (C) originates from a CWD positive herd.; 2.) All elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, sika deer, white-tailed deer, and mule deer entering Missouri from any state must have participated in a surveillance program for five consecutive years before the above mentioned animals will be allowed to enter Missouri from any state. ; 3.) Other captive cervids other than elk, elk-hybrids, red deer, sika deer, white-tailed deer and mule deer must have participated in a surveillance program recognized by the state of origin prior to entering Missouri. ; 4.) Animals must meet all state and federal chronic wasting disease testing requirements. As of March 1, 2010 all CWD related regulations have been completely removed from the Wildlife Code of Missouri. The Missouri Department of Agriculture has assumed the role of regulating and enforcing all CWD related regulations. The Wildlife Code of Missouir specifically states: "Animal health standards and movement activities shall comply with all state and federal regulations. (Refer to Missouri Department of Agriculture for applicable Chronic Wasting Disease rules and regulations.)"
New CWD Regulations in Development
See CWD Regulations. Cn March 1, 2010 all CWD related regulations were completely removed from the Wildlife Code of Missouri. The Missouri Department of Agriculture has assumed the role of regulating and enforcing all CWD related regulations. The Wildlife Code of Missouir specifically states: "Animal health standards and movement activities shall comply with all state and federal regulations. (Refer to Missouri Department of Agriculture for applicable Chronic Wasting Disease rules and regulations.)"
CWD Testing Program For Captive Cervids
Voluntary monitoring program developed and implemented in 2002 for captive industry. 1.) All captive whitetail deer that enter Missouri, (imports) and remain in Missouri at time of death, must be tested for CWD.
CWD Testing Program For Wildlife
Have tested more than 35,000 white-tailed deer statewide since 2001 . Five (5) deer have tested positive for CWD in the free-ranging population directly adjacent to a couple of captive deer facilities which had eleven (11) deer test positive for CWD.
Baiting Banned
Hunting deer, turkey and waterfowl over bait has been prohibited for many years in Missouri.
Feeding Banned
Grain, salt products, minerals and other consumable natural or manufactured products used to attract deer are prohibited in six-county CWD Containment Zone.
Ban On Movement of Animal Parts
As of March 1, 2010 the following verbiage has been added to the Wildlife Code of Missouri "Wildlife legally taken and exported from another state or country may also be shipped into Missouri by common carrier, except cervid carcasses or cervid carcass parts. The importation, transportation, or possession of cervid carcasses or cervid carcass parts taken from or obtained outside of Missouri is prohibited, except for meat that is cut and wrapped; meat that has been boned out; quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; hides or capes from which all excess tissue has been removed; antlers; antlers attached to skull plates or skulls cleaned of all muscle and brain tissue; upper canine teeth; and finished taxidermy products. Carcasses or parts of carcasses with the spinal column or head attached my be transported into the state only if they are reported to an agent of the department within twenty-four (24) hours of entering the state and then taken to a license meat processor or taxidermist within seventy-two (72) hours of entry. Licensed meat processors and taxidermists shall dispose of the discarded tissue in a properly permitted landfill.
CWD Found in Captive Cervids
Yes, in February 2010 one white-tailed deer that was tested during a routine herd culling operation in NE Missouri tested positive for CWD. The infected facility was depopulated in the spring of 2011 with no additional positive animals identified. In October of 2011 a second captive white-tailed deer in a different facility owned by the same individuals as the Feb 2011 positive animal was idnetified as a result of increased surveillance required after the inital CWD case. To date, a total of eleven (11 ) deer from two (2) different captive facilities owned by the same individuals have tested positive for CWD.
CWD Found In Free Ranging Cervids
Yes, five (5) free-ranging deer tested positive for CWD during targeted surveillance in the fall of 2011 around the two known CWD infected facilities in NE Missouri.

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